David Adler to Speak on Legal Issues In The Life Cycle of Theatrical Production

David M Adler, noted entertainment and creatival arts lawyer will be participating in the Visiting Artist Series with Reginald Lawrence (Shepsu Aakhu).

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 11:50 – 1:30 pm
DePaul Center – Room 80051 E. Jackson Blvd.Chicago, IL 60604
Lunch will be served.

Visiting Artist Reginald Lawrence (Shepsu Aakhu) will discuss the legal issues that he has faced in his multi-dimensional career as a playwright, producer, director, and arts educator.  In particular, he will focus on the life cycle of a theatrical production from dealing with authors to hiring actors, directors, and crew to mounting the finished production.  He will share his perspective on legal questions related to collaboration, intellectual property, and production credit.
Leading Chicago arts lawyer David Adler will join in the conversation, and Professor Margit Livingston will moderate.
For more information on the Visiting Artist Series, please click here.

Registration: General registration is $25 for the 1.5 hour CLE discussion.  To register, please visit http://www.regonline.com/reginaldlawrence.
DePaul students, faculty, and staff can register to attend for free by emailing Cecelia Story at cstory@depaul.edu.

DePaul University College of Law is an accredited CLE provider. This event has been approved for 1.5 CLE credits.

 

When Creative Content Does Not Equal Copyrighted Content

David M. Adler will be addressing the Chicago Bar Association’s Media & Entertainment Committee on May 27, 2010 at 12:15 P.M. on the topic of Advising Clients When Creative Content Does Not Equal Copyrighted Content – Transactional & Litigation Strategies and Brief Review of the UrineTown case.

David Adler represented the Chicago stage play team who created, produced, and directed a local run of UrineTown.  In response to threatened lawsuit/s, the team filed suit against another team of producers who formerly staged the play in New York.  (Mullen v. SSDC, et. al.)

One of the key issues addressed in the lawsuit dealt with whether or not creative endeavors such as stage directing and lighting design could be considered recognized works of authorship under the U.S. Copyright Act and defend its denial of copyright registration applications filed by the Broadway production team.  Prior to settlement, the U.S. Register of Copyrights filed a motion to increase the time with which to enter into the case.  There are numerous implications with respect to copyright protection and how to best serve your clients interests.