David M. Adler Speaking on Law & Social Data Panel at Chicago TechWeek 2012

Chicago is a new kind of technology hub, and the Techweek Conference is a new type of technology conference.

The Techweek 2012 Conference showcases the technology renaissance evolving in Chicago and the midwest. June 22-26, 2012

Law & Social Data
The past few years have witnessed an explosion of legal and regulatory activity involving social and other new media. This session will examine several key areas, including copyright, trademark and related intellectual property concerns; defamation, obscenity and related liability; false advertising and marketing restrictions; gaming; data privacy issues presented by social media; and impacts of social media on employees and the workplace. Attendees will learn how to identify legal risks and issues before they become full-scale emergencies and how to develop appropriate policies and guidelines covering social media activity.

Sunday June 24, 2012 3:00pm – 3:45pm @ 3 – 8 A/B (222 Merchandise Mart Plaza, Chicago, IL)

Social Media Legal News Highlights

CeBit 2012: Social media a legal minefield
Computerworld Australia

Government agencies looking to make greater use of social media and other collaboration tools face a raft of legal issues with the potential to sink efforts to better connect government and the public.

Unfiltered Orange | Weekly eDiscovery News Update – May 23, 2012
JD Supra

File-Sync-and-Share for Enterprises -bit.ly/KrIZmE
Should Active Directory Upgrade be Required in Exchange 15? bit.ly/Mkk4I9
Social Media Legal Best Practices: Problems and Solutions with Photo Uploading and Tagging …

The ‘7 Dirty Words’ Turn 40, but They’re Still Dirty
The Atlantic

They still resonates today, maintaining a perfect five-star rating among iTunes customers.
“I always thought it was a wrong-headed decision, one that really made hash of the First Amendment with respect to the broadcast media,” says Floyd Abrams, one of the foremost legal authorities on the First Amendment.

#Fashionlaw USA Network in Partnership With MR PORTER.COM Brings to Life the Stylish World
Sacramento Bee

USA Network will additionally support the partnership via on-air, online, VOD, paid media (including a special insert in the July issue of Vanity Fair) and in-show integration and messaging. All will compliment USA’s massive multi-pronged marketing.

Regional bloggers on both sides of political fence say robust online debate is not uncivil.
Grand Forks Herald

“People are creating a media (with blogs and other social media) they’re not getting from traditional media,” Nodland said. “Maybe it’s a little crude, hard-hitting … and traditional media fear it.”

DocStoc Launches 30 Free Apps to Help Small Business Owners Grow Their Businesses
San Francisco Chronicle (press release)

App highlights: http://www.docstoc.com/apps/ Social Media for Business: This app will explain how can you leverage social media to get an edge. How to Get a Job Interview: This app is a complete blueprint for landing your dream job.

Social Media Policies for Fashion Companies and Clothing Labels

In fashion, innovation never goes out of style. Therefore, it is no surprise that fashion houses and clothing brandsmarket across many different

Fashion (film)
Fashion (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

social media platforms. It is axiomatic that fashion marketing requires a deep understanding of the target audience, regardless of whether that knowledge comes from online or offline interaction. Social media provides a forum for a more authentic, transparent and personal engagement with the customer, but also highlights whether a brand has judged (or misjudged) its customer base.

To be successful in social media, brands need to harness the personality, wit, charm and, in all likelihood, free time of their staff. In order to ensure positive, informative and engaging social interaction, a fashion brand’s social media rules must be smart, positive and inclusive. Here are some guidelines for drafting a social media policy that will bring out the best in your brand, your employees (brand ambassadors) and your customers.

Rather than writing out a lengthy, legal boilerplate script, keep these considerations in mind when drafting your policy:

  • Philosophy. Begin with a discussion of how social media fits into an employee’s job expectations and performance. For example, guidelines are important, because if not followed “bad things” can happen, such as losing customers or vendors, the company could get into legal trouble, or worse, you could lose your job.
  • Behavioral Expectations. This is a good place to remind employees that even though it’s a big world, you are often in a small community and, on the Internet, it’s forever. What a person says can be seen by customers and employees all over the world.  Remind employees to stick to their areas of expertise and use respectful conduct. Other watch words include “timeliness” (posts should be fresh, current and relevant), “perspective” (something that may sound clever and racy to one person may be inaccurate or offensive to another), “transparency” (be the first to point out that you are an employee and make it clear that you are not a company spokesperson) and  “judiciousness” (use caution when discussing things where emotional topics like politics and religion and show respect for others’ opinions).
  • Channel expectations. If your company has a social media strategy, make sure employees know which sites (communication channels) are appropriate for which types of communications and marketing messages.
  • Contextual Expectations. Help employees understand the context within which they are engaging customers. Suggest using a conversational style. Remember that in customer’s eyes, “perception is reality.” Add value: Make sure your posts really add to the conversation. If they promote the company’s goals and values, supports the customers, improves or helps to sell products, or helps to do jobs better, then you are adding value.
  • Content Expectations. The policy must have clear and conspicuous language about what is considered company proprietary information, including current projects, trademarks, names, logos  and how they may be used. Never: (i)  discuss or post about financial information, sales trends, strategies, forecasts, legal issues and future promotional activities; (ii) post confidential or non-public information about the company; (iii) give out personal information about customers or employees; or (iv)  respond to an offensive or negative post by a customer.
  • Consequences. Lastly, be upfront about the very real consequences if mistakes are made. If a mistake occurs, correct it immediately and be clear about what’s been done to fix it. Contact the social media team if there’s a lesson to be learned.

David Adler to Speak on Legal Issues In The Life Cycle of Theatrical Production

David M Adler, noted entertainment and creatival arts lawyer will be participating in the Visiting Artist Series with Reginald Lawrence (Shepsu Aakhu).

Tuesday, April 10, 2012 11:50 – 1:30 pm
DePaul Center – Room 80051 E. Jackson Blvd.Chicago, IL 60604
Lunch will be served.

Visiting Artist Reginald Lawrence (Shepsu Aakhu) will discuss the legal issues that he has faced in his multi-dimensional career as a playwright, producer, director, and arts educator.  In particular, he will focus on the life cycle of a theatrical production from dealing with authors to hiring actors, directors, and crew to mounting the finished production.  He will share his perspective on legal questions related to collaboration, intellectual property, and production credit.
Leading Chicago arts lawyer David Adler will join in the conversation, and Professor Margit Livingston will moderate.
For more information on the Visiting Artist Series, please click here.

Registration: General registration is $25 for the 1.5 hour CLE discussion.  To register, please visit http://www.regonline.com/reginaldlawrence.
DePaul students, faculty, and staff can register to attend for free by emailing Cecelia Story at cstory@depaul.edu.

DePaul University College of Law is an accredited CLE provider. This event has been approved for 1.5 CLE credits.