U.K. entrepreneurs react to Brexit vote — VentureBeat

The UK’s tech community has reacted to today’s Brexit vote.The results, announced early this morning, saw 48.1% of voters asking to remain in the European Union (EU), whilst the remaining 51.9% voted for a Brexit. The news comes after various surveys conducted across the industry showed the tech sector’s overall support for remaining within the EU.…

via U.K. entrepreneurs react to Brexit vote — VentureBeat

You’re Invited to LAUNCH: Client Contracts 2.0

Contracts

DATE: Wednesday, June 29
TIME: 9:30AM to 11:30AM
LOCATION: New York Design Center, Conference Room
ADDRESS: 200 Lexington Avenue, NYC

Have you ever had a client refuse to pay a bill, not give you credit for your work, or use your design scheme without hiring you? As loathsome as these situations sound, the reality is that they happen more often than we like to admit. The best way to avoid these issues is to arm yourself with an airtight contract. For this task, we’ve enlisted David Adler, a Chicago-based lawyer who understands the ins and outs of the design industry, to serve as your legal expert for the morning. He will address some of the biggest risk factors interior designers face today and how your contract can (and more importantly, should) cover you. You’ll leave with a better understanding of how you can tighten up your existing contract so you don’t have to learn the hard way.

Register for the event here.

Adler Named 1 of @Law360’s 20 Attorneys Killing It On Twitter

The 20 Attorneys Killing It On Twitter

Law360, New York (September 11, 2015, 4:57 PM ET) — Some attorneys have figured out how to use their Twitter accounts to build their personal brand and network with peers and prospective clients, while also pumping out tweet after tweet of legal insight and hilarious anecdotes. The full article is available here.

Attorney David M. Adler in Chicago Illinois has been named as one of those 20 attorneys.

Getting Smart about Smart-Device #Privacy ISBA

My latest Article in the Illinois Bar Journal entitled – Getting Smart about Smart-Device , discusses wide range of legal and regulatory issues around privacy and security affecting the “Internet of Things.” This overview identifies risks and suggests some best practices for addressing privacy and security issues raised by IoT devices.

Illinois Bar Journal April 2016 • Volume 104 • Number 4 • Page 48

Full article available here.

Best Practices EU/US Privacy Shield

In case you missed it, Ken Dort at Drinker Biddle held a discussion covering high points of the EU/US Privacy Shield. Talking points covered:

1. Application Overview
2. Certification Issues
3. Privacy Shield Principles and Supplemental Principles
4. Implementation Timelines (Expected)
5. Best Practices Going Forward Pending Implementation

The draft EU-U.S. Privacy Shield “adequacy decision” includes the Privacy Shield Principles companies must follow. Suggested Best Practices for compliance with EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Principles include: evaluating disclosures about data collection and use to determine whether they are sufficiently clear and evident to consumers, and 2) giving strong consideration for implementation of a formal opt-in mechanism. European government trade regulators are concerned about whether consumers are being sufficiently informed about the nature and scale of data collection.

Ken graciously provided this great list of resources for the discussion:

* Full text of the Privacy Shield can be found here.

* European Commission draft adequacy decision can be found here.

* Department of Commerce Fact Sheet can be found here.

* European Commission Fact Sheet can be found here.

* European Commission FAQs can be found here.

* Statement from U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker on release of the Privacy Shield text can be found here.

* European Commission statement on the Privacy Shield text can be found here.

Article 29 Working Party statement on the Privacy Shield can be found here.

As part of Adler Law Group’s Privacy & Information Security Practice, we continue to follow the developments in this area. We can help you review, enhance and adopt standardized contracts and implement methodologies for approaching these challenges by setting objectives, determining scope, allocating resources, and developing agreements that will efficiently and effective manage risks.

Apple can comply with the FBI court order

Very good discussion of the technical issues behind the privacy issues.

Trail of Bits Blog

Earlier today, a federal judge ordered Apple to comply with the FBI’s request for technical assistance in the recovery of the San Bernadino gunmen’s iPhone 5C. Since then, many have argued whether these requests from the FBI are technically feasible given the support for strong encryption on iOS devices. Based on my initial reading of the request and my knowledge of the iOS platform, I believe all of the FBI’s requests are technically feasible.

The FBI’s Request

In a search after the shooting, the FBI discovered an iPhone belonging to one of the attackers. The iPhone is the property of the San Bernardino County Department of Public Health where the attacker worked and the FBI has permission to search it. However, the FBI has been unable, so far, to guess the passcode to unlock it. In iOS devices, nearly all important files are encrypted with a combination of the

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Adler Quoted in BNA’s Electronic Commerce & Law Report

devices

A recent article by Alexis Kramer, Legal Editor for Bloomberg BNA’s Electronic Commerce & Law Report, examines the nature of social media platform messenger applications and the move into e-commerce. This shift raises the implications for policing counterfeit goods and enforcement of online purchases.

The article entitled “E-Commerce May Come to Messaging Apps; Watch for Counterfeits and Contract Issues” highlights that “[b]uying and selling goods through messenger apps” … “is definitely the future of mobile.”

David M. Adler was interviewed for the article for insight around ecommerce legal issues, which include intellectual property and contractual issues, that arise when consumers transact business through messenger apps. Many of these issues were identified in his article Pinterest “Buyable Pins” And Ecommerce Liability.

The legal risks and issues vary widely depending on industry and product/service mix and encompass many interrelated areas of the law. Specifically, Adler inditified five main areas of concern for ecommerce, especially on mobile devices and/or through messenger apps:

  1. Trade & Commerce Issues (Brand protections)
  2. Online Agreements (limitations of liability)
  3. Intellectual Property Issues (content ownership and use)
  4. Privacy & Security (data gathering, usage, storage & sharing)
  5. Human Resources & Employment Issues (reputation and social media use)

Facebook, WeChat, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter and other social networks already allow users to send payments to one another through private messages. New tools such as the Pinterest “Buy Now” pin, and Twitter’s direct messages, facilitate commercial transactions with consumers.

As the article notes “enabling retail transactions via chat” opens the door for more counterfeit goods, difficulty monitoring the sales channel, increasing difficultly of enforcing online purchase terms, and lack of visual space to properly notify customers of the terms and conditions.

‘‘All the issues you would have when conducting transactions over the Internet are magnified when you’re using a messenger app,’’ David Adler, principal of Adler Law Group in Chicago, said.