COVID-19 is changing consumer behavior in important and probably permanent ways.

COVID-19 is changing consumer behavior in important and probably permanent ways. This is why marketers should take notice.

Sparked by the coronavirus pandemic, consumer and business e-commerce transactions accelerated the ongoing shift toward online commerce. This enables even more marketing opportunities that create real time connections with customers. From pink ribbons to Product Red, social feeds are full of calls to support those in need. In this way, online cause marketing can drive “consumption philanthropy” replacing mindless buying with virtuous action. Tying cause-worthy buying with the latest ecommerce boom creates new opportunities for marketers.

However, before turning your blog, social media accounts, or website into a funnel to raise money for First Responders, it is important to understand that all states have laws that govern charitable solicitations. Running promotions and undertaking solicitations for charities means that unless the business itself is set up as a tax exempt charitable entity, these activities are considered “Commercial co-ventures.” Generally this is a person (or business) who, for profit, is primarily engaged in commerce other than in connection with soliciting for charities and who conducts a charitable sales promotion.

In Illinois, Sec.3. (b) of the Solicitation for Charity Act provides the following persons shall not be required to register with the Attorney General: 3. “Persons requesting any contributions for the … benefit of any individual, specified by name at the time of the solicitation, if the contributions collected are turned over to the named beneficiary, first deducting reasonable expenses for costs of banquets, or social gatherings, if any, provided all fund raising functions are carried on by persons who are unpaid, directly or indirectly, for such services.” Emphasis mine.

Even if you are not raising money for a good cause, consider using disclaimer s to let your audience know product and company names are trademarks of the respective owners and does not imply any affiliation with or endorsement by them.